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Things To Consider When Using WordPress as a CMS

WordPress is first and foremost a blogging platform, but that doesn’t mean that it can’t be used for other things as well. In fact, the development of WordPress have been such that I wouldn’t be surprised to see a non-blog focused fork soon, because the necessary functionality for most web sites on the admin side of things are already there. I know, because I’ve installed and used WordPress as a content management system (CMS) for several clients the last year or so, and have had no complains yet.

“You’re crazy! Get Joomla/Drupal/Textpattern/something else instead!”

I would consider doing that, actually, if it wasn’t a fact that I know WordPress, can bend it to my will, and know that any necessary functionality I’d like to add is a mere plugin away. The fact that I’m using WordPress as a CMS for clients doesn’t mean that I don’t think that the other options out there, including TextPattern which intrigues me, are poor choices. I just know WordPress, and I know it is easy to use (as opposed to, say, Joomla) for not so familiar clients. Add a solid support for “static” content, being the WordPress Pages, and more newsy update flows controlled by the Posts, and you’ve got your needs pretty much covered for most websites online today.

Things to Consider when Choosing WordPress as a CMS

There are especially 3 things you need to consider before committing to WordPress as a CMS, and starting to plan it, as far as I can tell.

  1. Is the functionality needed covered by the WordPress core functions, and/or with the addition of (not too many) plugins? This is usually managing information pages (using Pages), and publishing news/press releases (using Posts). If I need to add a lot of custom stuff, including the custom fields, then perhaps it gets too complicated for the client.
  2. Is there a good translation of WordPress available, so that your client can get the backend in their own language? Why should my Swedish customers not have their CMS in Swedish? There is no reason, of course, and it is easy enough to install a language pack.
  3. Will my client be able to upgrade WordPress themselves, or do I need to make plans for this as well? This is true for most platforms out there, but nevertheless you’ll need to have an upgrade strategy.

The real issues present themselves when you’ve chosen WordPress as the CMS for your client project. That’s when you’ll have to think a bit outside the box, or not really, but at least peek over the blog focus edge at least.

Designing for Web Sites Powered by WordPress

In general, using WordPress as the CMS just means that you’ll design a theme as you would for a WordPress powered blog. Most of the things you need to keep in mind is what should be powering what on the site. For example, a company presentation should of course be a Page in WordPress, that way the company can edit it easily as well. With the 2.5 and 2.6 versions, the WYSIWYG editor is actually quite good as well, so there is no harm in this at all. Basically, you’ll use Pages for static content, just as you would on a blog, with the difference that Pages are your core content on the site, rather than posts, which is the core of any blog. This means that you’ll have to consider the Page hierarchy and presentation, possibly providing Page templates to control the layout a bit.

The front page of the website is another thing. These days, you can set a Page as the front page by visiting the WordPress settings (as opposed to the hacks of yonder). This is probably necessary for most traditional websites, so you’ll want to do a Page template for this particular front page Page as well, and make sure that the minimal (if any) editing that can be made from the WordPress backend should be used with caution. Breaking a front page isn’t a good thing, you know, and chances are there’s more than just text and a few images to manage, so keep the advanced stuff out of the editable part, putting them in the Page template instead.

Finally, there’s the updates, usually being company news or press releases or something similar. This content can easily be managed by using the Posts in WordPress, assigning a category for news, press releases, or whatever. This way you can have a page on the site (incidentally a Page in WordPress as well) that displays the content, and then link people to the category, possibly controlling it a bit by tweaking the category template. You could even bypass the page listing the content mentioned above, and just link the categories from the menu.

The Fiction page's sub menu

The Fiction page's sub menu

Speaking of the menu, chances are you can forget about using the WordPress functions to display Pages or categories, since that would and could mean that your client can break the design by accidentally creating un-necessary Pages or categories. I usually just put these links in the theme, and if they want to add a main category they’ll just have to contact me to do an edit. I do, however, try to make sure that adding sub-pages (i.e. Pages belonging to other Pages) will result in decent linkage on the mother Page, much like I’ve done on my fiction page over at tdhedengren.com.

Another thing you need to think about is what user priviligies your client will need to have. Sure, someone at “their side” needs to have admin priviligies, but that is probably not the general one needed. You need to consider this as well, as it is probably you that will be setting it up, and you don’t want the client to break the settings accidentally.

Checklist for Creating Web Sites with WordPress as the CMS

These are the things I tend to think about before choosing and designing a website where WordPress will be used as the CMS. There’s probably other things as well, things I just haven’t take into account since my clients haven’t had that kind of need yet. Feel free to add yours in the comments, sharing is caring after all.

  • Is there even a need for a CMS for the client?
  • Is WordPress the correct CMS? Will it fit the needs? Is the translations available for the WordPress backend good enough? How will it be upgraded?
  • Will I need to extend WordPress using plugins? Are any hacks to the core necessary, because if they are, how will I make sure that these won’t break when the core is upgraded?
  • What types of content will there be, and what should be deemed static (i.e. use Pages), and what is flowing updates (i.e. Posts)? How will I present this, and what is the main type of content?
  • How will the permalink structure be? Should it really say “category”, why not “view” or “updates” or something else?
  • Will the menu be static (i.e. coded into the theme) or controlled by WordPress (i.e. listing using WordPress tags for Pages and categories)? How could this go wrong in the future?
  • What hierarchy will the Pages have? This is important for the URL, since it should be coherent with the menu hierarchy after all.
  • How will I present sub-pages (i.e. Pages having a mother Page)? Should there be any at all?
  • Do I need Page templates for various sections? How will these work with sub-pages?
  • What categories will I use? Should the client be allowed to create new categories?
  • How will I present Posts content?
  • Do I need category templates for the various categories?

What is your experience with WordPress as a CMS, and have you anything to add to the list? Share in the comments.


  1. By Alexander Langer posted on July 30, 2008 at 6:41 am
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    To me it’s like the same but with Drupal.

    I know enough WordPress to get around. Actually I’m running my own personal blog on it and set up a few WP weblogs for friends as well as two WP powered corporate websites. But I’m by far not that deep into “bending it to my will” as you are. I had a rather big and complex website job last year for which I started with Drupal and it worked out just great. D turned out to be exactly to my liking and I’m using it in each and every dynamic web thing I did afterwards . It is my platform of choice right now.

    Currently I’m even strongly considering moving my personal weblog from WordPress to Drupal, because D is what I call home and I feel a lot more comfortable having to deal with only one system. In fact I gave Joomla a shot for a corporate website a year and a half ago, just to get some practical insights and the system really isn’t to my liking.

    So, if I had to draw a conclusion I’d say: Take a good look around, play with different systems and see with which you get along best. Do yourself a favor and stick with it. Don’t try to make you portfolio look like a zoo where each and every CMS has it’s own place.

    I like to think of it in this way: You may own a breed, but you can only ride one horse at a time.

  2. By Stefan posted on July 30, 2008 at 6:46 am
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    Hey,

    your article reflects what i’m actually thinking about. As most CMS are very big and heavy to handle, offer a lot too much features and don’t rely on my needs, i started to use WordPress for a few customer projects. This is a worthwile step forward, because you’ve got a very flexibel and easy-to-use backend while there are endless possibilites for the frontend.

    My main problem by using it is that there is no real system for structuring pages. Yes, you can choose a parent page, but there are still problems if you are trying to use different templates / designs.

    I would be glad to see some kind of midification that allows to transform WordPress in a ‘real’ CMS step by step. Integrating plugins is easy, but digging real deep is hard.

    Overall i’m exalted about the possibilites of WordPress. For a Webdesigner, it’s much easier to use and to implement than most other CMS. This might also drop back to customers who could get the service of a easy-to-use, stable and flexible CMS for a little surcharge.

  3. By Tracey Grady posted on July 30, 2008 at 8:28 am
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    When I first created a website using WordPress I had to tackle just about every question you’ve outlined here: this is a very comprehensive article. I think the level of support for WordPress from other users, bloggers and plugin authors is just phenomenal, and that makes it very attractive for use as a CMS.

  4. By Dirk Verbeeck posted on July 30, 2008 at 9:05 am
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    Currently, WordPress has one major disadvantage when using it as a CMS: it cannot properly deal with multiple languages. The existing plugins only do part of the job and are far from bug free. At this time of writing, we implemented already a few WP’s as CMS, but only in one language. For most european and asian companies a multilanguage site is an absolute must.

    However, we are so pleased with WP that we decided to develop a mulitingual solution that is at the same time easy to manage by the user and allows for a complete translation of all the elements of a webpage (not only title and body, but also meta tags, category headers, buttons, etc.).

    So, IMHO, above all one should consider if the client needs more than one language before proposing him WP as his new CMS. Otherwise you might run into big trouble afterwards. For the rest, I agree to all the above statements and I’m very positive about the possibilities of WordPress.

  5. By MorganizeIT posted on July 30, 2008 at 9:37 am
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    I’m a web developer and I got tired of starting from scratch when a client wants a new feature, so I’ve been taking the WordPress as CMS route also.

    Translation
    I’ve used the Global Tranlator plugin with good results so far. You can see the implementation at http://eyeswideopenaustin2008.com/ and the plugin is available from http://www.nothing2hide.net/wp-plugins/wordpress-global-translator-plugin/

    Upgrades
    I’m having a hard time in this area. In hindsight I’m wishing that I had opted to install via SVN so it would be easier to upgrade.

  6. By Jonnya posted on July 30, 2008 at 9:44 am
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    Great article… you are not alone! After working through various CMS solutions, I started a blog with WordPress and found it to be very easy to work with – so I started looking into how I could use it as a CMS platform. That was over 3 years ago and I haven’t looked back!

    It’s easy to update, easily modified through plugins (either third-party or your own) and provides a great, fairly lightweight CMS.

    I have been running a site called WP-CMS Mods over at http://www.wp-cms.com/ – information is slowly building up on the site.

    I have also written a plugin to help people use it as a CMS – called WP-CMS Post Control, which allows you to customise the write post/page panels and hide unwanted items. This works perfectly and I have much more functionality I am working on that will get rolled out in due-time. You can find the plugin over at http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wp-cms-post-control/

  7. By Robbi posted on July 30, 2008 at 9:51 am
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    I’ve been using WordPress for two years now, and think that it’s become easier and easier to use as a CMS, although, I’m not that good with designing themes. I have done two WordPress themes though, simply by adding the attributes and ensuring that they are styled properly. My first theme was quite difficult, but the second was easier, although my design skills are nowhere near noteworthy. I like the menu idea on your fiction page!

  8. By JamieO posted on July 30, 2008 at 9:52 am
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    Great article. There are already a number of important plugins to help this WordPress-as-a-CMS conversion and WeblogToolsCollection Plugin Competition recently added some more great plugins to the community that assist with this. In particular:

    Role Scoper for proper user role management
    WP Sentry for private posting control
    Idealien Category Enhancements (my own entry into the contest) which makes category and post templating as easy to manage as page templates by moving the selection process into manage > categories admin screen.

    Feel free to vote on the plugins that you like (especially mine :) as there are prizes on the line and the developers would appreciate the feedback.

  9. By Kevin posted on July 30, 2008 at 10:07 am
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    Great article. I think WordPress works incredibly well as a CMS. Years ago the likes of PHPNuke etc were incredibly popular but they were bloated and had dozens of modules you just didn’t need. There are some things like forum integration, improved user profiles etc that would make it a more complete CMS however these would work better as plugins rather than being coded into the public releases.

  10. By Dan posted on July 30, 2008 at 10:19 am
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    Thanks for this helpful, mysteriously timely article.

  11. By Steve posted on July 30, 2008 at 10:36 am
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    (echoing Dirk’s thoughts above)

    The only thing not mentioned here is trying to create a bilingual/trilingual/(or more) site using WordPress with “un-mirrored content”.

    Say you want to create a WP site that looks like http://www.mysite.com/en/ and http://www.mysite.com/fr/.

    * You want that site to have EN posts and FR posts
    * have the URL slugs, titles, tags, and categories in the appropriate language
    * And you might not have every post available in both languages.

    There are plugins out there that try and do this but nothing as far as I know that easily let’s you set this kinda of structure up and nothing which seems prime-time ready.

    some of the ones worth checking…
    http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/gengo/
    http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/xlanguage/

    The only solution I’ve ever put into production is using WP-MU with a shared theme and two blogs setup. This has worked but I’d love something simpler and slicker.

    If you need a site like this – carefully evaluate what is expected before you jump into using WP.

    Anyone have any more multi-language links or thoughts to add ?

  12. By Julie posted on July 30, 2008 at 10:39 am
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    Another thing to consider is whether you want a shopping cart. The wp-ecommerce plugin is a total mess; the new Market Theme has great potential but at this point it’s still too rough around the edges for anything but the simplest store. I can’t believe there aren’t better ecommerce solutions for WP, but so far I haven’t found any. Am I missing something?

  13. By Universal Indie Records posted on July 30, 2008 at 10:42 am
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    “I have also written a plugin to help people use it as a CMS – called WP-CMS Post Control, which allows you to customise the write post/page panels and hide unwanted items. ”

    I’ve been using WPLite for that same functionality for the sites I’ve been building for my clients. http://mahalkita.nanogeex.com/wplite/

  14. By Universal Indie Records posted on July 30, 2008 at 10:50 am
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    Jonnya ,
    Just downloaded and activated your “post control” plugin!!! Great plugin!!!

  15. By Universal Indie Records posted on July 30, 2008 at 11:21 am
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    “Another thing to consider is whether you want a shopping cart. The wp-ecommerce plugin is a total mess; the new Market Theme has great potential but at this point it’s still too rough around the edges for anything but the simplest store. I can’t believe there aren’t better ecommerce solutions for WP, but so far I haven’t found any. Am I missing something?”

    I agree wp-ecommerce is a mess… but have you checked out…
    E-Shop – http://www.quirm.net/page.php?id=39

    and for simpler needs there’s
    Quickshop – http://www.zackdesign.biz/wp-plugins/34

    For a more robust ecommerce solution.. you’ll have to bypass WordPress.

  16. By Dirk Verbeeck posted on July 30, 2008 at 11:55 am
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    @ Steve concerning multilanguage:

    * gengo has lots of bugs, works well on posts not on pages, does not offer possibility to translate category headings, theme elements, tags, etc.
    * xlanguage: as far as I remember, works only on posts; uses language tags within the same editor field, not very user friendly

    The solution we work on right now takes this all in consideration and allows for different pages in different languages. We are beta testing and should be able to release this plugin by the end of august.

    @ MorganizeIT: Global Translator is not an option for a professional CMS. Translations are being made, but sometimes with grave errors (as every machine translation still does). This can make some visitors laugh at times, but it can also scare away potential clients.

  17. By Steve posted on July 30, 2008 at 12:05 pm
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    great Dirk – can you let me know when it’s released ? steve [ @ ] plankdesign.com

  18. By Andrew posted on July 30, 2008 at 1:23 pm
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    Great article! I’ve used MODx as the CMS platform of choice in the past, but after using the 2.5 wordpress release when setting up my blog, and seeing the marked improvements on previous releases I’d be very happy to give it a go on a more “traditional” site when the opportunity comes along.

    The admin interface is workable and easy to understand for clients, with a good WYSIWYG posts editor, media library for uploading and handling images and media and has enough options to let non-web savvy clients get to grips with their websites without the need of hours of on-site training with them!

  19. By Dresah posted on July 30, 2008 at 2:54 pm
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    Excellent work. Thank you!

  20. By Anthony Damasco posted on July 30, 2008 at 3:17 pm
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    Haha, make wordpress bend to your will, that made me laugh. WordPress looks the best out of all the CMS systems, that’s why I used it.

    I hope to be able to customize it better soon.

    Good post

  21. By David Esrati posted on July 30, 2008 at 6:52 pm
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    We’ve looked at it from a clients comfort levels with technology. Many CMSs like Drupal and Joomla are more complex and require some tech skills.
    The key to any site being truly useful is how often it’s updated and is the content useful.
    Our first question to evaluate what kind of cms to use- is “How much geek do you speak?” and go on from there.
    For the most part- WordPress is incredibly easy, gives great search optimization, works on mobile platforms and makes it easy for clients to manage and update their own sites.

  22. By zack posted on July 30, 2008 at 8:52 pm
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    I use WordPress as a CMS for all of my client websites. I’ve assembled a portfolio of plugins I use for all of my wp-as-cms installations:
    AWS Easy Page Link
    Allows the client to create a link to another page within the site without having to hunt for the URL.
    Disable WordPress Core Update
    Use this to keep your clients from bugging you as soon as they see the "A newer version is available."

    Google XML Sitemaps
    Worth its weight in gold.

    Adminimize
    The wp interface is nice (especially in 2.5+), but this trims it down to save valuable screen space.
    WP-DB-Backup
    Emails you a database backup once a week. Perfect for the forgetful joneses out there.
     
    My only major frustration is in finding a comprehensive event/calendar plugin. GigPress is great for bands and tours, WPListCal handles simple scheduling (though it’s buggy), and Events Calendar chugs along, but I can’t find a decent calendar that handles different categories without throwing up all over itself. Any suggestions?

  23. By Ross Johnson posted on July 30, 2008 at 11:43 pm
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    I really get the feeling that so many people use wordpress as a CMS is because they haven’t tried any other solution long enough to learn it. I really see it very low on the chain of actual CMS’s.

    Everyone should check out SilverStripe, it is probably the best open source solution I have ever run across. Easy enough to customize with out thousands of plugins and modules, but flexible where I can create 100 – 200 page sites with out issue.

  24. By Aheb posted on July 31, 2008 at 12:53 am
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    90% of the time I’m finding WP to be overkill for most my clients so have settled on using a web based system such as http://www.cushycms.com instead.

  25. By 柳华芳 posted on July 31, 2008 at 1:06 am
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    wordpress is not well as cms

  26. By Sugar Web Design posted on July 31, 2008 at 4:03 am
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    Thanks for this great article. My experience with using WP as a CMS has been nothing but positive. Clients enjoy using it and there is so much you can do with it. I had a lightbulb moment when I realised that you can have separate templates for each category. Took my days to get over that one!

  27. By Jonnya posted on July 31, 2008 at 4:08 am
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    In my opinion – WordPress is not overkill… it is a well maintained, powerful system that can be adapted to a number of different situations (as I have done!). It is the most popular blog platform for a reason and is very easy to ‘simplify’ with a few plugins!

    “I’ve been using WPLite for that same functionality for the sites I’ve been building for my clients.” – I am aware of this plugin, but really you should use the ‘Role Manager’ plugin to remove these options – WPLite only hides them… they are still accessible through direct links I believe. Role Manager is a much more powerful way of ‘removing’ items from the admin menu. Also WP-CMS Post Control allows the Admin to have full options and lower users to have limited options, which means if you want to change something that’s hidden you don’t have to alter the plugin options every time (and expose them to your authors!).

    WP-CMS Post Control from http://www.wp-cms.com over at at http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wp-cms-post-control/ is an evolving plugin, and I have some new features almost ready to roll-out including changing the preference from Flash to HTTP upload (has caused problems for some people), revisions management and all sorts of scripty goodness. Now it is in the official WordPress plugin repository it will allow automatic update notifications – and even auto update through your plugin page!

  28. By Universal Indie Records posted on July 31, 2008 at 5:47 am
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    @Jonnya
    I tried Role Manager earlier on but didn’t “get it”. Maybe I’ll check back into it.

    @ Aheb
    I would never use CushyCms because I hate using hosted systems. I don’t want to take the chance that these companies go out of business.

    @Ross Johnson
    Thanks for the heads up on Silver Stripe.

  29. By Martin Emmerich posted on July 31, 2008 at 7:35 am
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    The article fits my personal story.
    I did some bigger Enterprise CMS projects. When starting as a freelancer I wanted to have my personal site and wanted to have a blog. Now I have the blog only, since the few static pages I need can be done perfectly with wordpress.
    A few customers use wordpress as CMS for small sites – for which it is IMHO perfect.

  30. By Jonnya posted on July 31, 2008 at 8:32 am
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    @ Universal Indie Records
    Yup, Role Manager is quite overwhelming to start off-with!! Take your time with it and my advice is to not use too many roles!! Most plugins also integrate nicely with it too, it has been picked up fairly recently by a new developer.

    I really do have a-lot planned for my Post Control plugin – although it’s lean and mean and works perfectly as is!

  31. By Brock posted on July 31, 2008 at 11:09 am
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    Yes, great post – very timely. I too am a WP-apostle. However, as I’m trying a CMS build for a pretty large corp, we’re running into issues with things like PDF document management, migrating the existing intranet, etc. I would prefer to make WP work, but will do my homework on some of the suggested sites.

    Thanks to Ross Johnson – I’ve never heard of SilverStripe – this looks very promising.

    Thanks Aheb – cushycms.com was down when I tried – will look there too.

  32. By kenrick posted on July 31, 2008 at 12:42 pm
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    i just wish wordpress had an easier handling of custom fields. its so much easier for me to make a fast wordpress site then a fast expression engine site.

  33. By Deny Sri Supriyono posted on July 31, 2008 at 2:08 pm
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    @steve
    another multi language plugin – http://www.qianqin.de/qtranslate/
    i’ve never used this plugin before but it might worth to try.

    keep the conversation flowing, guys – lots of enlightenment reading the post and comments here :)

  34. By Beinha posted on July 31, 2008 at 7:16 pm
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    Hi Zack,
    Have you tried this “Events v1.3″ plugin yet? I’m not sure if it’s as good as it seems but I’m looking for a good one also and I’ve found it 2 days ago. http://meandmymac.net/228/events-v13/
    Beinha

  35. By Robert Ouimet posted on July 31, 2008 at 11:24 pm
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    WordPress is an awesome CMS and has more than enough features for most situations. The right plug-ins and the right ‘add ons’ working in conjunctiont with WordPress make it pretty flexible.

    Just posted some thoughts and tips on a recent project here:

    http://robertouimet.com/2008/08/wordpress-up-to-the-challenge/

  36. By Báalam posted on July 31, 2008 at 11:28 pm
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    Totally agree…

    WordPress (Blog/CMS) and Drupal (CMS) my favorites… right now Im exploring Typo3 but the group support is just depressing and that’s what I like about WP support forums… no matter how stupid your question is, there’s most of the times somebody ready to slap you in the head.

    About language translation I think Global Translator its pretty good but of course it will never be as good as a human translation… hopefully this might change in the future.

    Learn CSS and understand PHP and nothing will stop you

    Cheers everyone

  37. By Liz posted on August 1, 2008 at 12:54 am
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    great post! I’ve used wordpress a few times for clients blogs, and my own, but am just venturing for the first time at using it for a full fledged CMS and im really pleased with how simple it is. I am able to pick up new things and learn how to do what i need very easily!

  38. By Mike Schnoor posted on August 1, 2008 at 3:06 am
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    Personally, I just re-created my private blog’s theme and added tons of functionality via plugins. At our company, we’re using wordpress for our entire company site – which requires some redesign, too… soon! :)

  39. By Alan Levine posted on August 1, 2008 at 3:25 am
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    Great article! WordPress rocks, rolls, and dances, and I use it for creating educational web sites. There is a lot to do beyond plug-ins; my approach is to find a good basic structural template, re-skin it, and rip apart the pieces and assemble them together to do what I need.

    You can go a long way with a bit of MySQL query magic and associated PHP. I provided a detail breakdown of one site in “WordPress Dissected”
    http://cogdogblog.com/2008/02/14/wordpressing-dissected/

    And several times I have presented this as a session on “Blogs That Dont Look Like Blogs” meaning using blog software (of which WP is the best IMHO) to make web sites that go beyond banner, sidebar and reverse chronological posts. I ask people to tag example sites:
    http://delicious.com/tag/notcatdiaries

  40. By Kalessin posted on August 1, 2008 at 8:32 am
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    A fantastic article, if only I’d read it before taking 6 months to develop Belmont Press the way I wanted it to work!

    A couple of points:

    “The fact that I’m using WordPress [...] doesn’t mean that I don’t think that the other options out there[...] are poor choices.”

    You have too many negatives in there, unless you do think the other options are poor choices!

    “These days, you can set a Page as the front page by visiting the WordPress settings (as opposed to the hacks of yonder).”

    That’s fine if the hacks are on the horizon, or somewhere in the distance. I suspect you’re referring to the hacks of yore, though.

    @ zack: Your Disable WordPress Core Update plugin is a must-have!

    @ Ross Johnson: I use WordPress as a CMS because, given the same amount of time playing with it, it was easier to do what I wanted than with Xoops, Joomla! and Drupal, even more so than PostNuke, which I had been using for years. I’ve just looked at SilverStripe though, and it looks good, gonna explore it later.

    @ Aheb: CushyCMS looks good, but I need to sell my clients a service for which there’s no single point of failure.

  41. By Doug posted on August 1, 2008 at 8:52 am
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    You ask:

    Will the menu be static (i.e. coded into the theme) or controlled by WordPress (i.e. listing using WordPress tags for Pages and categories)

    There is a third option that has worked well for me: Make the menu a Page in WordPress, then include this Page wherever you need the menu using the “Improved Include Page” plugin:
    http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/improved-include-page/

    The menu page should consist of a simple bulleted list, which is easy to style in CSS. And because it’s a WordPress Page, it editable from within WordPress.

  42. By Cátia Kitahara posted on August 1, 2008 at 9:04 am
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    I also consider these important things when using WordPress as a CMS:

    Are there good translations for the plugins you’ll use? The plugins also need to be translated if English is not your client’s first language
    Choose your plugins carefully – do their developpers continue their job, maintaining their plugins compatible with the latest versions of WP? Be cautious about new plugins, are they very well tested for bugs? What are the known issues? Does the owner offer good support?
    Though it’s very easy to use, maybe you’ll have to train your client on using WordPress. Don’t forget to iclude this service in your proposal. This is specially important for non-English speakers, as they don’t have the codex to come in their rescue. Also, you may consider writing a small guide.
    I hope it might help you!
    Cheers!

  43. By Tadd posted on August 1, 2008 at 10:37 am
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    I’ve used WordPress for the last year, and have had a few projects I’ve used WP as the CMS, and I got to say I was impressed with what you could do with a few simple code snippets and templated paged. It really has no limit as long as you understand basic stucture.

    Drupal is nice, but it’s too complex, especially if you need standard functionality. It’s great for massive, multiuser platforms. But now they have WordPress MU (and Buddypress) which work great and are growing. Really, WordPress has the ability to do just about anything that other platforms are doing now. You can use Simple Forum or BBPress for Forums, there is WP Commerce for shopping cart (though not exactly the best cart), galleries .. everything you need is there.

    Really it depends on how you look at WordPress. It still has the stigma of simply being a blogging platform – but really, they should start saying “WordPress CMS” because it really is more of a content management system than bland ol’ blogging.

  44. By 3magin8 posted on August 1, 2008 at 10:40 am
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    WordPress is a good CMS alternative. I found that other CMS scripts can be difficult and confusing to work with. WordPress is user friendly. All you need is plugins to suit your needs.

  45. By Jeffrey Morgan posted on August 1, 2008 at 11:00 am
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    I republished my website in WordPress when I discovered the K2 theme. I wrote about this in my first post: http://wp.jeffreyjmorgan.com/2008/05/moving-to-wordpress-and-k2/

    I thought about a CMS like Drupal before considering WordPress but Drupal seemed like overkill for my site. K2′s sidebar manager really enhances the usability of WordPress.

  46. By Bradley Charbonneau posted on August 2, 2008 at 6:41 am
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    Thanks much for the article. I have to say, I have the exact same thoughts, “I just know WordPress.” I’ve been down the whole path: from NetObject Fusion (remember that one?), to FrontPage, to Dreamweaver, to MoveableType, to WordPress, to Drupal (battled with it for a year–and lost), and then back to WordPress and I’m not switching again. Just too much time spent working with more programs when WordPress can do it all — or at least usually as much as I need. If a site needs more, hey, then it’s probably over my own head anyway.

    Thanks for the links to the e-commerce plugins above, I’ll have to check those out. I’ve used WP E-Commerce on a few sites and although it works fairly well, there are some glitches (granted, they could be my fault) that I’m just forever struggling with (e.g HTTPS, SSL only on checkout etc.).

    Some have mentioned menu challenges above. I like NAVT. If you want to get really fancy, you can even make top nav bars a “widget” and then use NAVT to manage them. Keeps you out of the code and can be easy enough for a non-techie (well … ) to use — with a bit of hand holding at first.

  47. By Brian Dusablon posted on August 2, 2008 at 11:36 am
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    I use WordPress frequently for simple CMS sites for clients that want to update their own pages and post occasional news articles or updates. While it’s not perfect, it does work and it’s interface, plugin community and theme availability and support are awesome.

    A few resources:
    Magento for ecommerce – it’s open source and plays nicely with WP.

    Google Calendar for your calendar/events – you can use google apps to set up a custom calendar and use the agenda view in the sidebar.

  48. By Jonnya posted on August 2, 2008 at 2:33 pm
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    I just find other traditional ‘CMS’ systems far too complicated – and users are totally bewildered with the interface! WordPress is clean and lean – with proven SEO, stability and scalability right out the box.

    It’s so much better to have a framework like this to use – where you just add on what you need – the plugin architecture ROCKS! You spend so long having to trim the fat of other CMS systems I honestly agree that WordPress is mature enough to be called a CMS, because that’s exactly what it is at the end of the day!

    On a final note my plugin – WP-CMS Post Control from http://www.wp-cms.com over at at http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wp-cms-post-control/ has just been updated to control ALL aspects of WordPress 2.6.

    It now allows you to turn the flash uploader on and off, along with post revisions and autosaving. Being able to turn post revisions off is pretty much essential if you are a web developer, or if you just don’t need the database bloat!

  49. By tsgee posted on August 2, 2008 at 9:42 pm
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    most CMS even Joomla is an overkill but WP makes the adhoc posting and customization catagories possible. check the WP DOC tons of information on the theme customization.

  50. By Gilbert posted on August 3, 2008 at 4:41 am
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    Great article. I find WordPress easy to use as a CMS because it is so flexible. After writing my own CMS I decided that it’s so much easier just using an app like WordPress.

    I’ve written a plugin for WordPress called wp-cms which changes the structure of the admin menu to act more like a CMS. This is great if you need clients to update your site as it makes things a lot simpler without losing any of the functionality of WordPress. See it at http://www.gilbertpellegrom.co.uk/wp-cms.

  51. By BANAGO posted on August 3, 2008 at 6:21 am
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    I have been using WP as a CMS for all my web design projects and clients.

  52. By Rachael Ransom posted on August 3, 2008 at 2:51 pm
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    WordPress is really good in some situations, but why would you try and force it into being a CMS when there are so many better platforms out there, like Squarespace (which I use)? A checklist of 10 things to consider as you attempt to morph WP into something it’s not? If you ACTUALLY pick a CMS, you get to remove the entire checklist above and actually get things done.

  53. By kevin posted on August 5, 2008 at 1:58 pm
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    yeah wordpress keeps getting better n better. we’ve been developing small-medium sized CMS websites using wordpress.
    - its user friendly
    - supported by 1000′s of users
    - keeps getting better
    - easy to customize

    but yeah…..i wouldn’t look @ wordpress for large/huge web projects and/or ecommerce projects.

  54. By kathy posted on August 6, 2008 at 7:12 pm
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    we want to use wordpress for CMS.

    we are trying to figure out how to set up a tempalte for a wordpress page that would work in a manner similar to joomla

    the template defines the positions/zones on the pages. each zone gets a name
    the user interface allows the admin to link data to each zone

    this way the admin does not need to be an html coder

    does anyone know of any plugs ins that allows the wordpress pages to work like the joomla themes do

    thanks

  55. By Rose posted on August 7, 2008 at 1:10 am
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    I love WordPress as a CMS – if you are proficient in CSS and PHP you can bend it to your will…

    Thanks for all the feedback, ideas and links people, most appreciated.

  56. By Andrew Odri posted on August 7, 2008 at 4:30 pm
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    I really like using WordPress, I’ve found that it delivers the most polished experience with the least amount of work. I only have a few misdemeanours: It’s a little bloated if you want to use solely as a CMS, and integrating a design can be a pretty big hassle if you just are solely a designer. They have made the initial installation a fair bit easier, but again, this still is pretty involved for a designer.

    The great thing about it is that users love because it is easy to use, and really intuitive to use.

    I think if they make it easier to integrate custom designs, and make some of the menu management and content structuring a little less ridged, it would have a much braoder appeal.

  57. By cyan posted on August 7, 2008 at 4:51 pm
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    @ Steve concerning multilanguage:

    We built this site (www.artexte.ca) and used the WordPress language switcher plugin. http://www.poplarware.com/languageplugin.html

    It worked very well for our purposes, and was very easy to implement. Users just enter both English and French content in each post/page, contained in special tags.

  58. By Steve posted on August 8, 2008 at 10:19 am
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    Thanks Cyan;

    We looked into that one and tested it out – it worked well except that it was a bit to tech for us to use as part of a CMS which clients could control. If it was something that only our ‘coding hands’ would touch then it would have been great.

    This is about as close as i’ve found so far;
    http://www.qianqin.de/qtranslate/

    Nice work on ARTEXTE btw —
    Funny thing is I’m writing this from 372 Ste. Catherine – next building over ! ;-)

    cheers,
    Steve

  59. By Dan Knauss posted on August 10, 2008 at 5:13 pm
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    Why do you think there will be a non-blogging fork of WordPress? WordPress already has lots of forks — but nobody knows about them or has access to them.

    Many companies have used WordPress, Drupal, Joomla, etc. without ever in participating in the development of the CMS they select. They take the “free” software, have programmers hack it to their own specifications, and you never see anything come back in the form of suggestions or extensions/plugins/modules.

    My guess is that this happens because the people who are most likely to be interested in FOSS CMSes like WordPress, Joomla, and Drupal (as opposed to Plone or Magnolia) are small to mid-sized businesses motivated by cost savings, and they see no incentive in participating in the development community. They may even see disincentives in participating in open source development.

    Building a website critical to your business with a popular, widely used, and inevitably PHP/mySQL-based FOSS CMS is a big security risk. (… for a variety of reasons that are more “cultural” than the “fault” of any particular codebase or server stack.) Enterprise site owners that commit to using frequently exploited PHP/mySQL based CMSes should have the foresight not to use a standard installation of WordPress or what-have-you. They may determine it’s necessary to create their own fork to maximize their control over the system and minimize the risk of being cracked. Also, releasing code they don’t intend to support isn’t going to fly well in the open source community, and it could be used to find vulnerabilities in their site–which they’ll probably see as a wholly bad thing.

    A public fork of WordPress for the purpose of developing it as a CMS is really unlikely to happen because the major users of WordPress as a serious CMS are acting in the “mercenary” ways described above. Furthermore, they’re just a small niche that wants a reasonably robust CMS that will work in the PHP server “ghetto.” The higher rollers will build with java, django, ruby, etc.

    Take a look at Krang: development on it appears moribund, but it has been used as a FOSS CMS to power major, major commercial sites. There are probably compelling technical reasons why Krang (or dotnetnuke) would be chosen over WordPress by multi-million and billion dollar businesses, and those reasons also explain why Krang is seemingly moribund…no site update for a year.

    Bloggers and amateur website operators are the dominant user-base driving development of systems like Drupal, Joomla, and WordPress. On the one hand, this is good–a lot of energy and stuff getting done–but what you get is something that isn’t quite a full CMS out of the box but can be cobbled into something resembling one after immense research, trial and error. So people do this, and some do it quietly, and they do it in ways that create forks you never heard about and will never learn from.

    I suspect this situation exists partly because the people driving and directing development of Joomla, Drupal, and WordPress are generally not familiar with the specific needs and operations of businesses that need a CMS, and it’s fair to say this is not their core concern–they’re just focused on building a good core you can customize many ways. The problem is, that hasn’t really happened yet. You can make a CMS out of any of them, but the people most motivated to do this will be least motivated to share what they achieve, and as a result possibly the best influences on development are never exercised.

  60. By cyan posted on August 11, 2008 at 9:26 am
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    Hi Steve,

    i guess the internet isn’t always such a big place :)

    I never came across qtranslate or maybe we would have tried it – is it really as simple as it sounds?

    -cyan

  61. By Steve posted on August 11, 2008 at 9:34 am
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    Cyan —

    I can’t tell you much about qTranslate as I discovered it after our last large bilingual WP project was already complete. I have it on the list to “put through the paces” and see how it performs. It does look very good though. The instal process seems overly simple;
    http://www.qianqin.de/qtranslate/installation-guide/

    Anyone else used qTranslate ?

    cheers,
    Steve

  62. By artmart posted on August 14, 2008 at 3:50 am
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    Yes… WordPress is a fantastic CMS.
    But if you would like to try out all the major Free CMS systems to see what suits you best then I suggest going to http://www.opensourcecms.com/ and trying them for yourself.

    As they say: opensourceCMS.com was created with one goal in mind. To give you the opportunity to “try out” some of the best php/mysql based free and open source software systems in the world.

  63. By ICT Blog posted on August 14, 2008 at 8:07 am
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    One thing to consider when using WordPress as a CMS for you customers is the fact that the software is regularly updated.

    When a new version is released your customers will see a message that urges them to upgrade. If you have quite a few customers running on WordPress this means that you will regularly have to upgrade their installations.

    I think it would be a good idea to charge a periodic maintenance fee to cover for the costs of upgrading your customers systems.
    Another route might be to use WordPress MU so you can place all your customers on one installation of WP. I do not have any experience with this though.

  64. By Dan Knauss posted on August 14, 2008 at 4:57 pm
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    WordPress is not a CMS. It is a really good, free blog with an unattractive user interface. It has a comment system that is a huge security vulnerability that’s not simple to eliminate if you want to build a site with it that is not a blog and has no need for comments.

    The only reason anyone uses WordPress to develop sites as a CMS is because it is free, does the basic chore of content management well, and generates clean, quality code. Templates for it are free and often outstanding. But the lack of a rapid way to place modules or blocks (sorry, widgets doesn’t cut it) as in Drupal or Joomla is a big limitation, as is the lack of a customizable ACL that is needed for any advanced community sites or social networking/publishing.

    @ICTBlog: your customers should be made to understand up front that their software will need to be updated frequently or risk being hacked — and the updates to WordPress or a plugin may break the functionality or design of some part of the site, requiring more involved maintenance. If you tell them that–the truth–then they will either 1) not hire you, 2) ignore it and maintain chronically obsolete software until they are hacked, 3) expect you to be their defacto webmaster forever, blaming you for anything that goes wrong and calling you all the time but not hiring you on a retainer, 4) take it upon themselves to learn to operate and update the site themselves, perhaps with some assistance from you.

    I suggest trying to push them toward #4.

  65. By musik posted on August 14, 2008 at 7:26 pm
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    My 2 cents..

    When using WordPress as a CMS don’t give the end user admin rights. They can still write, edit, delete and do what they need to do without being able to access the admin screens, keep them as an Editor.

    I agree you have to keep the sites up to date and upgrade when needed. If you are proficient and are hosting your customers yourself then you can write a prog which bulk updates everything but has a rollback feature if something goes wrong. It limits the amount of manual updating you need to do.

    I think what people are meaning about using WordPress as a good “CMS”, is that they can create a site which looks and feels like a regular website but where the end user can create/edit/delete new pages and they can also use the blog as a news section or event calendar (with the right hacks to use as a calendar see here http://wordpress.org/support/topic/181245?replies=5#post-778322). WP works great for these things.

    Some recommended plugins include:
    http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wp-cms-post-control/ (control what options your user has)
    http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/disable-wordpress-plugin-updates/ (won’t display the upgrade notice)
    http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wordpress-dashboard-editor/ (edit all the junk off the dashboard they don’t need to see)
    http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/tinymce-advanced/ (will give you an option to control the line break problem in the editor as well as give them a few more options the regular editor doesn’t have)

  66. By John Hoff - eVentureBiz posted on August 15, 2008 at 1:08 pm
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    I’ve designed a few websites using WordPress as a CMS.

    One thing that is helpful is to comment out key parts of the template’s code which can help my customer’s site feel less like a blog and more like a normal website.

    For example, instead of just closing comments, you could comment out that line of code (some themes will say “Comments are closed” and you don’t want that showing).

  67. By Michiel van der Blonk posted on August 17, 2008 at 12:29 am
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    I was very fed up with systems like drupal, joomla and modX. They always talks about ‘blocks’, as if I want every website to look like a box-in-a-box. That’s what it always ends up like. Using WordPress you take the basics, and anything added can be functionally and visually very different from the rest of the site. That’s what I like about it. The pain of upgrades stays though.

    And multi-language? We made a multi language site for a local small company. Just add a body class with the language code, and use image replacement techniques for anything that needs translation. It’s a lot of work, but it works for everything.

    ClassyBody is the best plugin ever.

  68. By Ossie Jesson posted on September 9, 2008 at 1:37 pm
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    Hi I am an amateur hoping to build a website using WordPress (my first in 5 years ,last time I used “frames ” remember those ?and a program called PAge Plus ) for its CMS ability because there will be content updated daily .Can somone reccomend a theme that will allow a menu bar with drop downs across the top for navigating around the site in the old fashioned way ? Thanks

  69. By Sławek posted on September 10, 2008 at 5:45 pm
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    Thanks for sharing. Awesome checklist and article. I’m looking through the net for arguments which cms system to choose from: wordpress or drupal for corporate site(s). I’m already done few sites on drupal and wordpress but, I encounter on such clients who have heard about the wordpress, that it’s only (sic!) blog platform. Hope that WordPress will be known some day as good CMS system for every kind of site. Cheers!

  70. By Patrick posted on November 3, 2008 at 4:54 pm
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    I’m a little late to this article, but I have a question still.

    I modified (extensively) a theme for a client who needed a free, easy to use CMS. All pages were staitc except for one, which needed daily updates. Voila! WordPress to the rescue, and it has worked extremely well for them.

    Now, though, that client needs for more than one directory on their site to be update-able. I’m struggling with how I’m going to accomplish this. Do I install another WordPress blog (on seperate MySQL database, of course) on the same site? Will doing so make their website too slow?

    Any advice is greatly appreciated. BTW, I love this site, it’s on my daily reading list.

  71. By Jed posted on November 4, 2008 at 1:06 pm
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    Keep a good work man!,

  72. By Rich Helms posted on December 3, 2008 at 12:55 pm
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    I have been developing for the web for 15 years. I hand write complex sites for large clients but for small sites love WordPress. An example of why is the iPhone. I wanted my sites to look better on the iPhone and iTouch. I wrote a template I call RHPhone that when it senses an iPhone displays the site in smartphone friendly way.

    http://webmasterinresidence.ca/webmasterinresidence/?cat=12

  73. By Michael Shearer posted on December 4, 2008 at 11:54 am
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    For every site I do these days, I use wordpress as a cms.

    Here are some examples: http://www.anandashala.com, http://www.berzaci.com, http://www.dolcefine.com, http://www.fackasports.com, http://www.holistictherapiesinc.net and more

    To me there are only a few essential plugins, being: posts by category widgets, all in one seo pack and a form plugin of your choice (cforms is a good one) .

    I’ve found that search engines take kindly to all of my wordpress as cms sites, too.

  74. By Faliq posted on December 10, 2008 at 4:07 am
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    Hi guys,

    check my site using wordpress

    http://www.sutekisushi.com

  75. By Jonnya posted on December 17, 2008 at 9:36 am
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    I hope you are all getting on well with the new itterface of WordPress 2.7 – quite a change (for the better I have to say!!). It makes it feel even more like a CMS out of the box now!

    I just thought that I’d let you know that the WP-CMS Post Control plugin has now been updated to incorporate the new features on WordPress 2.7 and above over at http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wp-cms-post-control/

    It gives you complete control over the write post and page panels, along with some cool new features for WordPress 2.7 only, like hide the favourite dropdown and even the ‘screen options’ dropdown – which once set becomes quite unnecessary – only leading to confussion and questions from most clients (great for us that actually understand WordPress though!).

  76. By SubmitMyPage posted on January 2, 2009 at 6:45 pm
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    Excellent read and very valuable tips over here.

  77. By Kashif posted on January 11, 2009 at 6:05 pm
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    We are using wordpress at http://www.apnijobs.com

    At this point we are planning to extend current functionality and the duel is between WP and Drupal.

  78. By iPin posted on January 25, 2009 at 11:58 pm
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    In this way, wordpress can be a mode, a framework, a core to rebuild all the things that need to be personalized. Now is CMS, next time maybe another Google :)

  79. By mindy posted on February 9, 2009 at 1:13 pm
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    I used wp as a cms for a church client’s site last year because they needed a huge website and would continually be making updates and adding pages.

    I easily used page templates for the inner pages because all they had was one text area, but when it came to the home page (which had multiple editable text regions), I feel like I did a major hack and was wondering if there’s an easier way to do what I did. What I ended up doing was using posts for the home page and just showing a certain post’s number for each region to show that particular post. Then they would just always edit that specific post and it would update on the home page. For instance, this is a snippet of code that I used to display post #18:

    Is there an easier/cleaner way to deal with multiple editable regions on one page?

  80. By mindy posted on February 9, 2009 at 1:13 pm
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    I used wp as a cms for a church client’s site last year because they needed a huge website and would continually be making updates and adding pages.

    I easily used page templates for the inner pages because all they had was one text area, but when it came to the home page (which had multiple editable text regions), I feel like I did a major hack and was wondering if there’s an easier way to do what I did. What I ended up doing was using posts for the home page and just showing a certain post’s number for each region to show that particular post. Then they would just always edit that specific post and it would update on the home page. For instance, this is a snippet of code that I used to display post #18:

    Is there an easier/cleaner way to deal with multiple editable regions on one page?

  81. By meekish posted on March 3, 2009 at 11:56 pm
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    @mindy: I ran into the same need for multiple editable regions. I found More Fields. It seems like a good solution so far.

  82. By Jerrol Krause posted on March 24, 2009 at 8:27 pm
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    I just recently launched a large several hundred page website using WordPress. WordPress stands heads and shoulders over the other CMS’s in terms of usability and simplicity. It also doesn’t add much overhead to setting up over non CMS driven sites. One thing I really appreciate is the availability of plugins to add advanced functionality; no more need to spend a lot of time custom coding a form yourself, just drop in a plugin and voila.

    WP is still a few versions away from ‘enterprise level’ functionality though. A lot of capability that it needs in order to really shine has to be hacked in via plugins or custom modifications. I’m hoping to see that added in over the next few versions.

    For small to medium sized sites, WP is definitely the way to go. For larger sites it’s a bit tougher of a decision. I would probably recommend Drupal or ModX at that point depending whether or not you need more advanced functionality than WordPress can handle.

  83. By Dennis posted on March 25, 2009 at 8:07 pm
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    Hi, I used wordpress as a cms for my own project, links is attached. It works very good. Had to use a lot of loops but WP-SuperCache and Minify helped a lot to reduce the load time.

  84. By Duetekeetty posted on April 16, 2009 at 11:27 pm
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    nice, really nice!

  85. By Hoodgrown Magazine posted on April 17, 2009 at 10:19 am
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    Jonnya ,
    I’m using your CMS Post control now as opposed to WPLite because WPLite is giving my clients login errors.

    But I’d like the ability to hide more things from my clients than your current plugin offers. If a clients site doesn’t call for post, comments, users, etc… I’d like the ability to hide that and only present them with exactly what they need to update their site.

  86. By musik posted on April 17, 2009 at 11:47 pm
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    Hoodgrown Mag,

    To do that I use a self-edited version of the Hide Dashboard Plugin which hides the dashboard and user menus etc for those with editor roles http://www.kpdesign.net/wp-plugins/wp-hide-dashboard/ (although the original plugin use it to hide all this from subscribers)

    It leads them to their profile page when they log in but they cant see any admin stuff, just Posts, Media, Links, Pages and comments.

  87. By Hoodgrown Magazine posted on April 17, 2009 at 11:52 pm
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    musik,
    That’s a good plugin I’m definitely going to check into it. But what I’m looking for is a program that will let me decide what to hide.

    I just designed a site for a Spa recently. The only thing I would like them to be able to see when the log in are the “pages”

    For another site… I might only want them to see the “post” and “media”….

    I need a plugin with the flexibility to show only what I want the client to see.

  88. By Wessel van Rensburg posted on May 14, 2009 at 6:50 pm
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    Dirk Verbeek mentions that WordPress has one major problem – that it can’t be used to build a site in multiple languages. Oh yes it can. We built this site for the European election in 23 languages. http://www.caneuhearme.eu/eu/

  89. By john posted on May 22, 2009 at 1:56 pm
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    Excellent, comprehensive article. Thanks.

  90. By Anish K.S posted on June 2, 2009 at 9:59 am
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    Nice post mate, very useful one. :)

  91. By Edward Palomo posted on June 9, 2009 at 5:55 am
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    I’m planning to use WordPress as CMS for our school organization website that you can find at http://www.tomasinoweb.org/ . But I still have doubts if our webmaster will approve my plan as all the website owned by our school runs on Joomla…

  92. By Edward Palomo posted on June 9, 2009 at 6:01 am
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    Can someone tell me what plugin this site uses as slideshow in its fromtpage http://www.sutekisushi.com thanks!

  93. By Lee posted on June 30, 2009 at 12:20 pm
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    Hi

    I’ve been building bespoke CMS for a long time now using interakt/addt but dont see a long term future for it. I’m trying to look at wordpress or drupal etc as an option.

    Can anyone recommend any simple Themes for a business site, so many look like blogs. I need something very simple, 6 pages, no comments etc, just the editability really.

    Any suggestions please?

    Thanks

    Lee

  94. By Robby posted on July 13, 2009 at 4:04 pm
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    WordPress is still the best while Joomla is the first choice for business and e-commerce sites. Thanks for listing these CMS

  95. By Kevin posted on October 11, 2009 at 11:04 am
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    I ran across this post checking out WP as a CMS results on Google and a number of the entries mentioned WP’s lack of ability to function in multiple languages. I’m working with a relatively new plugin now that does a really interesting job of unifying “WP as a CMS” and “Multilingual capability” in a single plugin. Thought I’d drop in a reference in case anyone else had run across this issue:

    http://wpml.org

  96. By Charlotte posted on October 15, 2009 at 11:10 am
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    Thanks for the post, it’s really useful to see others take on using wordpress as a CMS.

    Charlotte

  97. By Altis Lo (Beaulife) posted on November 26, 2009 at 3:16 pm
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    I love WordPress for its functionality and scalability CMS for many purposes you could think of: Blog, website, e-commerce site, intranet etc.

    [Delighting Lifestyle] Best Buy And Idea | Blog And Store.
    Follow me on Twitter.

  98. By Scott posted on November 29, 2009 at 12:32 am
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    Hi guys,

    I’m very new to WordPress, but am impressed by the plugins. However, slightly off-topic, but I’ve created a CMS that contains a few of these features either as standard, or as a plugin.

    An online demo and a free, downloadable version will be available very soon and can be seen at http://scottjarvis.com. I’d be interested to know how it compares for anyone who is familiar with wordpress.

    Thanks.

  99. 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